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Little Si — September 2003

As you drive Interstate 90 east, you may not notice Little Si, a rock outcrop situated between North Bend and massive Mount Si behind. However, the trail to the top of Little Si offers some noteworthy views and some interesting vegetation. The distance is approximately a mile and a half each way, with a 1300 ft. elevation gain.

The trail heads sharply up through Salmonberry and mixed coniferous and deciduous trees. Listen for the drumming of Pileated Woodpeckers. The route levels out and continues up the south side of a draw between Mount Si and Little Si. Note the steep cliffs on the left, a popular site for rock climbing enthusiasts. There is plenty of moisture and shade, making this portion of the trail an excellent site for a rich understory of Sword Fern. You can find Trillium and Twisted Stalk near the trail. The route passes through a tree fall area and then begins the final ascent up the north side of Little Si. Here the terrain is drier and more light reaches the understory. In this section, Sword Fern is replaced by thick stands of Salal and Oregon Grape. Look also for Rattlesnake Plantain and Pyrola. The understory is thick with Red Huckleberry, with increasing incidence of Ocean Spray as you climb. There are short, steep sections of trail in the last 1/2 mile, so bring your walking stick and exercise care in negotiating rocky sections of the trail. [Since this writing, the trail has been much improved. Ed.] At the top the view opens out, with North Bend visible below. There are numerous rocky ledges providing wonderful spots for a leisurely lunch. You will find beautiful examples of Hairy Manzanita and Serviceberry on the top. A few Parsley Ferns can be found among the rocks.

To reach the trailhead, take I-90 to exit 31 (Rte 202). Cross under the interstate and proceed into Bend on Rte 202 (also called North Bend Blvd.) for 0.6 miles. Turn right on North Bend Way and proceed for 1.3 miles, continuing past the Ranger Station on the left. Turn left on Mount Si Road, and park in a small parking area on the left just after crossing the bridge (0.5 miles). Park here and walk 0.2 miles to the trailhead, which is situated to the left as you leave the parking lot. Walk down the road past five houses on the right, until you see the trailhead sign. There are no facilities.



Updated: July 3, 2016
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