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California oatgrass (Danthonia californica) photographed by Rod Gilbert. Copyright 2013. All rights reserved.

Home > Grasses Workshop

Know Your Grasses: the Identification and Appreciation of Grass

 

Course Documents -- Follow-up

 

Information for Participants_Know Your Grasses Workshop 2013

Grass Workshop Introduction

Grass Identification in Washington

GRASSES OF DISCOVERY PARK.June 2013

POACEAE OF EASTERN WASHINGTON 2013

POACEAE OF WESTERN WASHINGTON 2013

Basic Grass Terminology -- Presentation

INTRO to Grasses -- Presentation

Major Grass Genera -- Presentation

More Grass Genera -- Presentation

GRASSES AS INVASIVE SPECIES

 

 


Identifying grasses with Clay Antieau. Photographed by Regina Johnson. Copyright 2013. All rights reserved.
A workshop sponsored by the Washington Native Plant Society and the University of Washington Herbarium at the Burke Museum

Dates: 9:00 am Wednesday, June 12 to 1:00 pm Friday, June 14, 2013

Instructor: Clayton Antieau, M.S., Ph.C.

Location: Room 246, Hitchcock Hall, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington

Workshop fee: $350; ($300 for WNPS Members or Burke Museum Members); includes field trip transportation.

Registration deadline: June 5 (no refunds for registration cancellation after June 1)


Course Description

"Knowing Your Grasses" is critical to many fields of science and practice, including wetland identification and delineation, ecosystem restoration, erosion control, and interpretation of natural history. Beautiful and diverse, grasses are globally important in many ways—fundamental to the past and future survival of humans. The Washington Native Plant Society and the University of Washington Herbarium are proudly partnering to offer this grass identification Workshop.

The Workshop consists of an intensive, hands-on approach that blends one and a half days of classroom work with one day of field study using a combination of lectures, guided examination of live and pressed plant specimens (with and without stereo-microscopes), and use of technical identification keys. Participants learn the grass language and distinguishing features of the grass family, its major taxonomic subdivisions, and many grass genera and species. The Workshop also connects you with useful on-line tools such as identification keys and photo resources.

This Workshop focuses on both native and naturalized grasses, with an emphasis on the field identification of genera and species commonly observed in habitats of the moist-maritime Pacific Northwest. There are fascinating excursions into invasive grasses, rare grasses, and ornamental (introduced) grasses.

The Workshop also explores the adaptive characteristics, habitat affinities, and restoration role of grasses; most grasses are informative indicator species. In addition, the workshop reviews intriguing conservation challenges involving grass.

Each day starts with a lecture followed by lab work or field visits. Field study in a variety of upland habitats provides study material for lab and opportunity to discuss many species and their habitats. Keying exercises involve instructor-led group keying and paired or individual keying mostly in the lab.

Itinerary

Lab items and reference materials

Instructor biography

Clay Antieau M.S., Ph.C. is a horticulturist, botanist, and environmental scientist who enthusiastically combines these disciplines to offer unique abilities and perspectives in environmental education and science. Clay currently works for the City of Seattle as an environmental permit specialist. He’s a recognized local authority and educator in Northwest flora and has taught courses in plant identification, wetland science, restoration science, and related subjects at the University of Washington and numerous technical and community colleges around Washington. He’s been teaching grass identification for more than 20 years, and is well regarded for providing engaging and effective learning experiences for students.

Prerequisites

Other than a high degree of interest in grasses, there are no prerequisites. Prior experience in plant taxonomy or botany is not a requirement. Really. This Workshop benefits anyone, from scientist to steward . . . novice to expert.

 

For more information

Contact Clay Antieau or David Giblin for Course Information:
Clay: clay39@netzero.net, 206-233-3711
David: dgiblin@u.washington.edu, 206-543-1682

Contact Catherine Hovanic for Registration Information: wnps@wnps.org, 206-527-3210
For more information about Scholarship Opportunities: wnps@wnps.org