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The Wenatchee Valley Chapter

Chapter Information

APRIL OUTINGS HAVE BEEN SCHEDULED

Check out the great offerings below. Be sure to RSVP if required. You don't want to miss out!  

Date/Time

Leader

Description and Details

Partner

April 6 Thursday, 2 4pm

April 18 Tuesday 5-7pm

April 20 Thursday 5 to 7pm

May 4 Thursday 5 to 7pm 

May 9th Tuesday 2-4pm and 6-7pm

Connie McCauley

Leavenworth Ski Hill Wildflower Walks

Join Connie McCauley to explore the ski hill area, looking at wildflowers, birds and wildlife. Depending on interest and conditions. Participants will explore both the ski trails and mountain bike trails during the 2-3 hour walks.  Connie has explored these hills for more than 40 years and enjoys sharing her local knowledge with all ages and backgrounds.  Meet at the Ski Hill parking area on 10701 Ski Hill Drive in Leavenworth. RSVP appreciated but not required. RSVP by contacting Hillary at (509) 667-9708 or emailing hillary@cdlandtrust.org

CDLT

April 17 Monday 5:30 -7:00

May 24 Monday 5:30 -7:00

Susan Ballinger

 

Wenatchee Foothills Walk – Jacobson Preserve

Spend 1 ½ hours surrounded by blooming wildflowers with a great view to lift your spirits.  Conservation Fellow Susan Ballinger has designed these short weekday strolls to fit a busy schedule and all ages. Walks will cover less than one mile at a slow pace.  Bring your camera! Susan has been studying the native plants in our foothills for over 20 years and enjoys introducing them to others.  Be prepared for all types of weather – we will only cancel if the trails are too muddy.  Plan to arrive at the trailhead a few minutes before the starting time.

 

CDLT

April 19 Wednesday 9 to 12:00

April 24 Monday  1:30-4:30

Mall Boyd

 

Icicle Ridge Hike

Join Mall Boyd on an exploration of the Icicle Ridge Trail looking at wildflowers and wildlife. The Icicle Ridge Trail is popular with runners and hikers as it climbs 1800 feet in 2.5 miles to the saddle, with views into Tumwater Canyon and a viewpoint overlooking Leavenworth, but how high we go on the nature walk will depend on the interest and the fitness level of the group.

Meet at the trailhead: 1.4 miles up Icicle Road to the Icicle Ridge trailhead sign. Turn right and then make a quick left. The trailhead parking lot is ahead. Allow for up to 3 hours.  This program is made possible by a partnership with the Washington Native Plant Society.RSVP appreciated but not required. RSVP by contacting Hillary at (509) 667-9708 or emailing hillary@cdlandtrust.org

CDLT 

April 21 Friday  9:00 to 4:00

 

Cindy Luskus

Dusty Lake (Quincy Lakes area)

Join Cindy Luskus for an early spring exploration of the Dusty Lake area and an opportunity to see lots of spring shrub-steppe plants! The hike is a 3-mile round trip on a trail with an elevation loss and gain of 900 feet.   If the group is up for it, there is an opportunity to wander around the ledges in the area.  Pace will be easy. 

Be prepared to spend the day with lunch, water, hiking boots and clothing for varied spring weather and wind.  Bring guide books and binoculars. Meet at 9 am at the Park and Ride on Penny Rd in Old Station.  Plan on being back at the P&R by 4 pm, if not earlier. 

Limit of 12 participants. RSVP to Cindy Luksus, 509-888-0245 or cluksus@nwi.net

 

NPS 

April 23 Sunday 1:00-4:00 pm

 
Don & Ann Schaetel 

Sam Hill Wildflower Walk

Don't miss this! See the wildflowers at the Land Trust's Sam Hill property, just inside Icicle Canyon near Leavenworth. This property is unique and hosts a variety of beautiful and interesting plants.

Join CDLT board member Ann Schaechtel and Washington Native Plant Society Wenatchee Valley Chapter President Don Schaechtel on Sunday, April 23 from 1-4 pm for a wildflower walk. This is a joint Washington Native Plant Society and Land Trust event.

Even though the mileage is short, the terrain is rugged. Wear hiking boots, bring water and snacks, and dress for the weather. There will be a 12 person limit for this outing. Meeting location and directions will be emailed to participants prior to the event.

Please call 509.667.9708 or email hillary@cdlandtrust.org to register.

CDLT 

April 29 Sunday 11:00  

 

May 14 Sunday 11:00 

Andrea Nesbitt

Wildhorse Wind Farm Wildflower and Wind Power Walks

Puget Sound Wind Energy’s Wildhorse Wind Farm is a fantastic place to see native shrub-steppe wildflowers, elk and birds in the early spring. You can check out the visitor’s center and see a 360 degree view of Mount Rainier, Mount Adams, Mount Hood, and the Columbia River Basin and explore one of the best examples of our native shrub steppe vegetation during the height of wildflower bloom. 17 miles east of Ellensburg. RSVP to: wildhorse@pse.com

 
Mid-May    Glacier View / Horselike Reserve / DETAILS TBD  

May 20 Saturday 1-4pm

 

Leavenworth Spring Bird Fest Wildflower Walk

Take a delightful stroll along meadows and pine-forested trails and discover some of the native plants of Eastern Washington with Washington Native Plant Society member Connie McCauley and others. A list of all known plant species found at the Ski Hill and helpful information regarding plant families will be made available to all participants.  Meet at the Ski Hill parking lot at the end of Ski Hill Drive.

Bird Fest & NPS
May 31 OR June 3 Joan Frazee & Ann Fink Chumstick Mountain / DETAILS TBD NPS
    CHECK BACK LATER FOR JUNE TRIPS  

 

 

Wenatchee Chapter 2016 Plant of the Year:

Nicotiana Attentua (Coyote Tobacco)

by Molly Boyter

Nicotiana attenuata is a rare annual that is found in Washington east of the Cascades, as well as other parts of the West.  It is strong smelling, hairy, and sticky, and grows to 3-10 dm.  The leaves are larger and lance-ovate at the bottom to reduced and more linear at the top.  The corolla is up to 3.5 cm long, white, and blooms from June to September.Coyote Tobacco

As part of my job as a botanist at the Bureau of Land Management I am responsible for monitoring rare plants, and have been trying to relocate Nicotiana populations since 2010.  After reading the descriptions of this flower I thought it would be easy to recognize, monitor, and report my findings.  However I was unable to find the plants at any of the former sites on BLM lands in Douglas Creek and Moses Coulee.  What was I missing?

In 2015, while driving through an area that burned in the 2014 Palisades fire, I saw a few rather tall forbs with white flowers which stood out starkly against the rocky coulee walls.  I thought it was strange to see a showy flower so late in the season since most things have begun to dry up on the Columbia Plateau by this time.  It was just about the only thing blooming at this location, which was just starting to recover from the fire the year before but had very little vegetative cover.

I hopped out to see if I could identify this mystery plant.  Maybe, just maybe, this was the elusive Nicotiana!  It was sticky, and stinky, and growing big and bold where almost nothing else was.  There were hundreds of these plants growing on the coulee floor and even into the rocky slopes.  I returned a few days later with a botany intern and we counted over 2000 plants on 40 acres, an astounding number since most sites in our records reported only scattered handfuls of individuals. Pam Camp graciously volunteered her time to look at the plants and confirmed their identity.  It was Nicotiana attenuata!

Since noting this population in 2015, I have become a fire follower, looking for ‘new’ Nicotiana populations in areas of likely habitat that have recently burned.  In 2016, BLM interns and I have documented sites in many recently burned areas of Douglas Creek, Burton Draw near Jameson Lake, and the Columbia River.  Though recent large fires have been extremely devastating to the sagebrush habitat in our region, it has been fascinating and exciting to discover the persistence of this little plant that has been hiding in the seed bank.  Where will it pop up next?

 



Updated: April 14, 2017
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